School of Arts & Humanities presents

CAN THE NATION BE BLACK? LITERATURE, RACE AND MODERNITY IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY CUBA

PUEDE SER NEGRA LA NACIÓN? LITERATURA, RAZA Y

MODERNIDAD EN LA CUBA DEL XIX

TUESDAY, APRIL 11 4:15 P.M.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES ROOM, HARPER HALL

Claremont Graduate University 150 E. 10th St., Claremont, CA 91711

Alberto Abreu Arcia is an award-winning Cuban creative writer, literary critic and essayist of African descent. He is the author of the forthcoming book, Por una Cuba negra: Literatura, raza y modernidad en el siglo XIX [For a Black Cuba: Literature, Race and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century, Editorial Hypermedia). This book is a literary-histórica I study of nineteenth-century Cuban literary movements and writers—both whites and people of color—who were central to the ways in which the construction of blackness shaped the national imaginary, including Domingo Del Monte, Plácido, Juan Francisco Manzano and Teatro Bufo. Abreu Arcia argues that literary authority was constituted through racial silences and exclusions in the construction of the nation.

Simultaneous translation in English will be provided. Sponsored by the departments of Cultural Studies, English and History and the Africana Studies Program at Claremont Graduate University; the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at Claremont McKenna College; the Humanities Institute at Scripps College; the Latin American Studies Program and the Romance Languages Department of Pomona College; and the Intercollegiate Department of Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies of the Claremont Colleges.

Refreshments will be served.

Anuncios